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I couldn’t relate more to this piece (or less to your ungenerous comment). Feeling as if you are simultaneously young and old is a common experience and a BIG part of what this magazine explores. And generations aren’t so precisely defined by particular dates. It’s give or take a few years, in either direction. Kim is an absolute icon among Gen X-ers.

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Nothing against Kim-but if one can't comment honestly on pieces, then how can one become a subscriber? I enjoy reading them but don't relate to each one the same. She sounds like a lovely woman. Not a demographic Gen X-er in my opinion, but lovely. And feeling simultaneously young and old is not only common but absolutely universal. Nevertheless that doesn't mean one enjoys being called a girl ( ie under age 18) as Carolita notes below. just as a man may not enjoy being called a boy. That's quite individual. It's a beautifully written piece. But if readers can't express differing opinions -and they are deemed 'ungenerous' then and genuine debate/discussion cannot ensue, we have just an echo chamber. I won't comment again.

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Mar 18, 2022·edited Mar 18, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

Although I wasn't "fired--dramatically and publicly--from my position," I did QUIT dramatically and publicly. The repercussions were huge and I"m still finding my way. Good to hear from others who not only survived, but thrived.

And PS. Still laughing at this:

>>At 58, it's a huge relief to not put myself in a position to be rejected for not being a “digital native” by some 28-year-old who doesn’t know the difference between their and there.

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That line resonated for me, too, because at 58 I AM a digital native! I’ve been online and using these tools since the early 1980s.

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still laughing at that one too!

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Mar 18, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

I was kicked to the curb at 45 from my job as Digital Director at Rolling Stone (after 6 years) and couldn't agree more: the liberation is real! I'm glad I achieved that goal of working for a publication that meant so much to me (and so many others), but I've been so much happier without the unnecessary burdens and restrictions under that unhealthy lifestyle. Thanks for writing this, Kim!

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I enjoyed reading this so much. I recently retired and have been struggling to work out who I am without my job title. I've started calling myself a writer and it feels good, although still a little bold, which is weird because I've been writing and editing (documents, films, presentations) for my whole career. It's fun and exciting to have the chance to reinvent yourself.

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Mar 18, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

Happy to never be called a girl again. Woman works for me. So does ma’am.

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I love hearing that there are others out there who still identify as girls--even at a certain age. I feel like a girl more than a woman and in the right light (or lack therof) I can almost pass for one. And dancing at concerts is still my thing. I've done two so far this week and have one to go to tonight.

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Mar 25, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

You are an inspiration for all “girls of a certain age” to embrace change and be creative in their expressions of themselves. I love the way you made concrete choices to find a meaningful path to happiness and wholeness. Thanks for sharing your story.

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Mar 24, 2022Liked by Sari Botton, Kim France

Love this piece so much. It’s great to hear stories of successful women re-evaluate what success really means, what it really costs, and how one might redefine it with the perspective that getting older affords us!

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There's a real freedom in giving up trying to fit into a mold you never chose in the first place. My magazine production job ended when I was in my 50s, had reached the pinnacle of a field that was fast disappearing, and was making more money than I actually needed. Looking for something to tide me over, I still remember the look of shock on some 20-year-old faces as I interviewed for receptionists jobs and they'd expected another 20-something! Waitress gigs were asking for headshots. Luckily, it was the Obama-era of two-year-long unemployment, so I had that cushion. My paycheck got smaller, but my world got bigger, it fit better, and I was able to see what was important to me, the inside me.

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Glad to hear that you were making more money than you actually needed.

Personally, I have never had that experience—though I still aspire to!

Enjoy your semiretirement or “downshift” or whatever.

Now, where can I find some reading material that provides some instruction and encouragement for those of us who can’t afford to be so “zen” about unemployment or underemployment?

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One of my favorite Oldster posts. Thank you for sharing your story.

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Mar 18, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

I love this post.

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LOVED this! I’m 46, and I recently walked away from my career as a social worker. I am using my savings to take a year off to explore what’s next. I’ve been channeling my lighter side, writing a newsletter about celebrities and pop culture, sometimes inserting my social work take on celebs and movie/tv characters. It’s encouraging to hear that there are options out there!

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It’s encouraging to hear that there are options for a FEW women like Kim to start a new business—in the field of selling resignation about workplace ageism and sexism to other women.

There are always a few careers to be made in selling fashion, beauty products, and dubious lifestyle choices to other women.

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Jan 2Liked by Sari Botton, Kim France

kim, you are always so frank and open about the struggles you have had. I am so proud of you, love mom

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May 30, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

I love this piece, and yes to "feeling around for myself." That's a perfect way to describe this moment in (my) and your life. Thanks for this.

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Mar 26, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

Always a delight to read Kim France and the insight of a fellow gen xer on this journey called life.

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Mar 25, 2022Liked by Sari Botton

I was let go by the private equity firm that owned the small beauty brand I worked for at 65. The reduction in stress and unhappiness is tangible, and has freed me to think creatively about my next chapter and where I can go with my experience. I'm still in the "honeymoon" phase but recently read about Lisa Price (founder of Carol's Daughter) who mentioned that without the daily stress that people experience due to their high pressure jobs, it opens up new avenues of creativity and options. So, that's what I'm trying to focus on now. Kim, I think your being unhappy and not native to the job you held as editor helped you explore other avenues for your creativity and opened your eyes to new possibilities. Love the blog and I'm a faithful listener to your podcast. Keep up the great work!

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